Dr. Gregory Cascino on Epilepsy

On Saturday, August 13,  Mayo Clinic Medical Edge Weekend  featured Mayo Clinic neurologist, Dr. Gregory Cascino, on epilepsy.

Medical Edge Weekend 8-13-11

For background, here’s some video of Dr. Cascino talking about diagnosing epilepsy, from Mayo Clinic’s YouTube channel.

6 Comments

  1. ROBERTO SEGURA FIGUE
    Posted August 7, 2011 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

    ¿SERÁ REALMENTE TAN SÚBITA ESA MUERTE, LO QUE QUIERE DECIR QUE NO EXISTEN ANTECEDENTES PERSONALES PATOLÓGICOS QUE ANUNCIEN SU LLEGADA?

    • Makala Johnson
      Posted August 18, 2011 at 11:58 am | Permalink

      Dr. Cascino responde: El mecanismo asociado con “la muerte súbita en epilepsia” no es bien conocido. Es probable que involucre un cambio de la función del corazón y la respiración asociada con una convulsión. Typicamente es un acontecimiento agudo.

  2. Susan Clark
    Posted August 8, 2011 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

    My son visited your clinic for a few days of exams and was not considered a good risk for surgery. This was 10 years ago. What are the latest advances in the areas of medications for epilepsy. His are myoclonic seizures as best I understand which started after a near-deadly episode of bacterial meningitis when he was 6 months old. He is now 32. He is currently on neurotin (generic) and carbatrol (non-generic).

    • Tracy
      Posted August 17, 2011 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

      Dr. Cascino replies “There are several new medications that have been approved for patients with seizure disorders. If your son continues to have recurrent seizure despite taking antiepileptic drug medication I would recommend he see a neurologist with an interest in epilepsy for a contemporary evaluation.”

  3. Rachel
    Posted August 12, 2011 at 8:19 pm | Permalink

    I was diagnosed with epilepsy 5 months after the onset of my seizures at age 20. All of my scans have been clean–no tumors, lesions, etc. My epilepsy is very well-controlled with medication (I’ve am seizure free for 2.5 years), so I know I am better off than most individuals with epilepsy. However, with no identifiable cause of my seizures, I’m pretty frustrated. Is there any way that I could ever have something to point my finger at as the reason?

    • Newsletter Editor
      Posted August 15, 2011 at 9:40 am | Permalink

      Rachel, we have received your question but unfortunately, we cannot diagnose conditions, provide second opinions or make specific treatment recommendations through this correspondence. If you would like to seek help from Mayo Clinic, please call one of our appointment offices.

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